Things To Do in Sanur

Sanur Beach
Sanur Beach

Sanur Beach stretches 8 km along the south-eastern coastline of Bali. Several notable beaches are connected by a paved footpath. It starts from the beach of Padanggalak, which hosts the annual Bali Kites Festival. For unique urban exploration, you can try the wondrous ruins of Taman Festival Bali, one of Bali’s mysterious ghost towns. This abandoned amusement park features vine-covered structures and theatre ruins, attracting those looking for haunting photo opportunities.

Around 2 km south is the beach of Pantai Matahari Terbit (Sunrise Beach). Similar to Padanggalak, this 500-metre stretch is usually frequented by locals on weekends. A small cluster of warung (traditional food stalls) sell local dishes and drinks. The beach walkway continues further south, where you’ll find most of the main beaches of Sanur.

Turtle Conservation & Education centre

The Turtle Conservation and Education Centre (TCEC) serves as a hatchery, nursery and sanctuary for rescued turtles. The centre is open for the public year-round. Well-shaded open-air pools separate the turtles according to size. Its supervising staff can provide information and brief tours if they aren’t busy maintaining the pools or feeding the turtles. There’s also a small sandy enclosure for tortoises, a hatchling pen, and a small souvenir shop selling turtle-themed items.

Blanjong Temple
Blanjong Temple

Blanjong Temple displays one of Bali’s oldest known artefacts, which dates back to AD914. It’s a stone pillar with Sanskrit inscriptions, and is believed to be some sort of victory monument, chiefly of King Sri Kesari Warmadewa. The first king of the Balinese Warmadewa dynasty. He was believed to have installed Bali’s first formal government.
Blanjong Temple also showcases sandstone statues of Hindu lord Ganesh and various animal figures. The temple is a national cultural heritage site and welcomes visitors year-round

Le Mayeur Museum
Le Mayeur Museum

Le Mayeur Museum mainly houses the artworks and personal history of Brussels-born painter, Adrien-Jean Le Mayeur de Merpres (1880–1958). The memorial and art museum is located on the main Sanur Beach of Sindhum, behind a row of art and souvenir stalls.
Le Mayeur Museum has around 80 paintings categorised by mediums like hardboard, plywood, canvas and paper. The main building features the former living quarters of the couple, with classical Balinese elements, sculpted stone walls and red terrazzo floor tiles

Kite Surfing Sanur
Kite Surfing

Kitesurfing in Bali is an extreme water sport that combines surfing with some elements of wakeboarding and paragliding. Also known as kiteboarding, it uses a traction kite and a board to help you propel across the waters, instead of paddling out and waiting for the perfect swell.
Some of the best coasts for kitesurfing in Bali include Sanur’s southeast-facing Mertasari Beach and down to Tanjung Benoa and Nusa Dua. Sanur is excellent for beginners as this area enjoys a constant flow of onshore winds and flatwater near the shoreline. Tanjung Benoa is Bali’s premier playground for water sports, including kiteboarding. Head there early as it can get rather crowded

Sindhu Night Market
Sindhu Night Market

Pasar Sindu Night Market is the main fresh market within the Sanur village area. Locals call it Pasar Tradisional Desa Sanur, though travellers usually know it better as the Sindu Night Market. The market is near the northern end of Sanur’s Jalan Danau Tamblingan road. You’ll find a bustling street food vendor scene, with stalls opening after sundown. These night vendors occupy most of its front parking space.

Before sunrise, Sindu Market is already very much alive. Plenty of stalls open within the main area, sheltered under its large warehouse-like structure. Although it carries ‘traditional’ in its name, the market is modern and clean. There are around 150 stands lining its ceramic-tiled lanes. Many offer fresh fruits, vegetables and spices, while others sell flowers and young coconut leaves for daily Hindu Balinese offerings.